Follow HomeGrown on twitter @homegrowncycles

Username:

Password:

Fargot Password? / Help

Author: admin

0

SUV of the bicycle world.

0

Staying Alive

Bicycle Portraits - Staying Alive from Bicycle Portraits on Vimeo.
0

We Love Paper Street

we love paper street its where we got our start

0

Detroit Cycle City

Check out this weeks Metrotimes cover story and find out why Detroit has so much bicycle potential.
0

Runs on FAT

Make sure you get your bike serviced and save some money .
0

Ferndale bike polo

ATTENTION!

Any one who is interested in playing bike polo every sunday at or around 2pm go to Donald Red Geary Park located at Pinecrest Dr &  Earle Blvd in Ferndale..doesnt matter what kind of bike you have just bring your malett and come play!

about one mile from HGC world headquarters and 2 miles from I75 here is a link on how to make your own mallet courtesy of hardcordbikepolo.com
0

BP

enough said
0

Critical Mass Detroit

0

Paper Street Motors

Paper street motors the place we like to call home has their site up and running check them out

0

HomeGrownCycles World Headquarters

Within the walls at Paper street is where you will find HomeGrownCycles world headquarters on the corner of wanda and jarvis in Ferndale Michigan.
0

Arial view

After a slow trip from oxford to ferndale our surface plate arrived in the shop, its a 1000 pound slab of granite that we will use to build our HGC frames.  The shop walls have ben mudded and taped and await Paint.  Our site will be under going some mush needed changes in the near future a more user friendly and informative site will take its place.  We are still doing repair on a daily basis so don't forget to get your ride in for a tune up, and greatly increase the life of your bicycle.
0

From The Stall

Read more
2

Shop Walls

The shop walls have been erected.  
0

framebuilders are people too.

velocipede salon .there are untold numbers of people involved in the bicycle industry plying various trades to keep the rest of us satisfied on the weekend ride. and all the cycley bits in between. i'm sure there are even more than those of which i'm aware, but it's probably enough for now to be going on with. and an untold number of those are just like you and i, except with a bit more talent in directions that we wish our own talents lay. not for them the strange and contrived acronyms that decorate many a carbon seatstay, proclaiming features that we don't understand, and to be honest, probably don't actually need. at the industrial end of the market there is a growing need to differentiate, and if that means inventing new technical features that only pretend to exist, then so be it. marketing will do that to you. Read more
0

Why Not In Detroit ?

A local graduate ofUnited Bicycle Institute'sframe building school plans to start a club that will help builders pool resources and have a better chance at success. Roland Couture is a 41 year-old, self-described "tinkerer, lifetime cyclist, and musician smart enough to have an engineering degree, but with too much rebel/ADD/disillusionment to sit still in the corporate world like a good boy." Couture's vision for the Portland Framebuilder Club (he's bought the domain name but is still working on the site) is a to create an informal network where builders could come together, learn from each other, and more. Couture hopes to someday collect dues and pool finances so that fledgling builders could afford expensive tools, share shop space (a "club shop" he calls it) where members could schedule work time, get volume discounts on materials, and host professional development seminars and clinics. Nine builders have already expressed interested in becoming members and Couture says he hopes to add more names to his list the coming weeks. Couture is aware of the existing Oregon Bicycle Constructors Association -- a non-profit organization that has builders from throughout the state and puts on a major annual bike show -- but says the scope of his club would be "more local and more hands-on." He also points out that established builders would also be welcome to join. "It should be pretty awesome for lots of folks whether framebuilding is 'just a hobby' or a professional aspiration."
0

Month One

The first month at paper street motors has come and gone. The shop is still up and running and we didn't burn the pace down. Were still in a transition phase while the shop grows, there are walls and benches to be assembled, and inventory to stock.  HGC has gone from a casual basement business to a full blown repair shop in just a few short months, and we continue to grow each day.  We look forward to the next month and hopefully many more after that.  Lets get those bikes on the road.
2

HC HOOLIGANS

Look out for the HC Hoolgans this season  a newly formed team looking to stand high on the podium this year.
0

Gone Camping

HGC will be in leota for the weekend all repairs will resume on monday!!
0

HomeGrownShop

recent photo of the shop as it starts to take form.  the shop gives us much more space to do work that we couldn't get done in the truck.  After we finish a bike we like to play a little bike polo in the rest of the warehouse space.
0

Bicycle powered washing machine

Homeless Dave's Bike Powered Washing Machine Of all the potential bicycle powered applications, other than the primary one of simply gettin' around, washing machines seem the most practical to us. With the bike powered wash cycle, someday spin class and laundromats could co-locate. In the meantime, if you've got the space, a BPWM can also water your garden while giving you a chance to loose a few pounds. There are a couple of designs floating around the internets, but we like Homeless Dave's the best because it you don't need to do any welding or fabrication of special parts. Homeless Dave's extensive instructions require scavenging a bike, a trainer (we found one in the street, but we've also seen them at garage sales and thrift stores), and a top loading machine. Homeless Dave's design only does the spin cycle, not the washing, so it will be up to Homegrown Revolution to come up with a design for a full-on bike powered washing machine (we'll wait for our hated Sears model to die first). When that day comes we'll post the design and a special soak and spin music mix.
0

Detroit Bicycle lanes

Detroit to put 30 miles of bicycle lanes on streets

Detroit is embarking on an ambitious plan to create bike lanes on roads across town, giving cyclists like Jon Koller designated space for riding as city leaders and community groups rethink street and land use in a shrinking city. It's a big change. Although the city is starting with about 30 miles in a handful of neighborhoods this year, there eventually could be as many as 400 miles of bike lanes in Detroit. "I think it's going to encourage more people to get out there and take biking as a serious form of transportation," said Koller, 25, who lives in the city's Corktown neighborhood and commutes by bike to Wayne State University, where he's a doctoral student in transportation engineering. Supporters envision a city that's easier to maneuver without a car, with bike lanes and paths connecting the Cultural Center, Mexicantown, parks and other attractions. The largest share of 30 miles of marked on-street bike lanes that the city plans to add this year will be 17 miles in southwest Detroit connecting the Corktown and Mexicantown neighborhoods. Read more
1

The Shop

HomeGrownCycles recently moved into a 20,000 sq ft business incubator located in Ferndale.  Our space is a 500 square foot work in progress, soon to be fitted wrap around benches, heavy duty park tool work stand, rubber flooring, and lots of tools.  We will soon have regular business hours to drop off, or you bikes or have them picked up by Big Yelloww.
0

Bike ART

some good bike art I found while surfing the bike blogs check out the rest by clicking on the image.
0

Because MMBA says so

Your Name Isn't Mud!

Do not give yourself or other mountain bikers a bad name by riding on trails during the spring thaw.  The recent warm weather may be melting the snow, but the sub-surface layers of soil are still partially frozen.  Trails are critically sensitive to erosion damage at this time. Currently, water from the melting snow is unable to sink into the soil, so trail surfaces are muddy.  Tire ruts help channel this water and contribute to erosion and muddy spots that can become long-term trail damage. A good rule of thumb is that when the earthworms begin to emerge, the ground is thawed.  Please ride on pavement or gravel roads for a few more weeks while the trails properly thaw and dry out.  Help us keep trails open to mountain biking by riding in an environmentally sound manner.
0

Phill wood RIP

Hub-Maker Phil Wood Passes Away BAXTER, IA (BRAIN)—Phil Wood, the man responsible for sealed hubs and bottom brackets, died this week on his farm in Baxter, Iowa. He was 84. He started the Phil Wood Company in 1971 as primarily a hub maker, though he offered other components. He sold the business to Peter Enright and a group of investors in 1991. “I feel so lucky to have talked with him about a week before he passed away, and he mentioned again that he was so lucky to sell the business when he did,” said Enright, Phil Wood Company’s president. “We talked off and on over the years, usually to catch up on news about his friends in the bike business. But he was quite happy to return to the farm after selling the business to help raise his granddaughter,” Enright added. Wood was a problem-solver working at Food Machinery Corporation. Had he not been bothered chasing bearings for a hub he was rebuilding for his daughter, sealed-bearing hubs might have taken years to hit the bike market, Enright noted. “He was complaining to Spence Wolf about why no one offered a sealed bearing hub and Wolf told him to make his own hub. A little while later he asked Spence how many he should make. It took Spence a bit to remember what he was talking about. He said make 50 hubs and the business was launched,” Enright said. Wood’s family is deciding on funeral arrangements at this time. “I’m glad he and I were able to have that last chat. He was a little bothered he wasn’t as ambulatory as he once was but he was content to move on,” Enright said. —Matt Wiebe